img_3556Shatter Me is an incredibly gross offender of the abuse romanticism that goes on in YA novels. I recently finished a reread of Shatter Me in which I annotated the novel to point out in-depth signs of the moments in which abuse happens and how it is subsequently romanticized by the author. Currently, I have finished detailing a commentary on the first ten chapters (linked below). With that said, there are a still a lot of books in young adult literature that romanticize abuse. I personally think that Shatter Me was an excellent place to start considering the fact that not many people talk about how problematic it is.

That said, I’d like to continue this with other books once I have finished the Shatter Me series. On my list of books to dissect and reveal next are:

After by Anna Todd
The Cruel Prince (series) by Holly Black
Poison Princess by Kresley Cole
Twilight (series) by Stephenie Meyer

Obviously, however, there are tons of books out there that romanticize abuse. In this vein, if you know of one — some of those listed above were recommendations from Twitter — please feel free to drop their titles in the comments below. My main goal with this is to raise awareness of how deeply problematic these books are and exactly why this is the case. And I hope, with this, some of the toxicity of thought can be remedied for future young readers and build a discussion for why this sort of behavior is not something to ever condone in real relationships.

Chapter One
Chapter Two
Chapter Three
Chapter Four
Chapters Five & Six
Chapters Seven & Eight
Chapter Nine
Chapter Ten

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One thought on “Which Books in YA Romanticize Abuse?

  1. I mean, A Court of Thorns and Roses does, if you consider it YA, because Rhysand’s treatment of Feyre in book one is hprrifying

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