the quiet you carryThe Quiet You Carry by Nikki Barthelmess is one of those proceed with caution kind of books that is also exceptionally important. From what I can tell thus far after having perused some of the reviews for this book is that it is one of the more accurate portrayals of a teenager dealing with life in the foster system where there are overworked social workers and foster homes that might not be quite right for the kids who find themselves living there. There are a lot of trigger warnings in the reviews for this book and so that is something to be very aware of if you are considering picking up this book. For reference, the trigger warnings I’ve seen listed are thus: Abuse/Family Violence, Sexual Assault/Molestation, Alcohol, Suicide Attempt, Self Harm, Eating Disorders, Physical and Mental Illness. if these are the sort of things that will make it difficult for you to handle reading a book, I would suggest passing on this particular novel.

As for me, I’ve decided to add it to my TBR. In fact, I’ve added it to my Next-Up shelf as well because I would rather read this novel sooner than later. I know that The Quiet You Carry is going to be an incredibly rough novel to read. But what I find important about books like this is the fact that they shine light on situations that are very real for a number of young teens, experiences that I would not wish on my worst enemy happening to entirely innocent people who never deserved to go through so much pain. I think this information needs to be out there so that others know these stories are not just something they can distance themselves from by pretending these things do not happen. And others who have been through similar situations might feel a need to know they are not alone. Obviously, it does depend.

Victoria Parker knew her dad’s behavior toward her was a little unusual, but she convinced herself everything was fine—until she found herself locked out of the house at 3:00 a.m., surrounded by flashing police lights.
Now, dumped into a crowded, chaotic foster home, Victoria has to tiptoe around her domineering foster mother, get through senior year at a new school, and somehow salvage her college dreams . . . all while keeping her past hidden.
But some secrets won’t stay buried—especially when unwanted memories make Victoria freeze up at random moments and nightmares disrupt her sleep. Even worse, she can’t stop worrying about her stepsister Sarah, left behind with her father. All she wants is to move forward, but how do you focus on the future when the past won’t leave you alone?

I want to see if this book handles the subject matter well. From what I’ve read so far, it seems as though it does. How are you feeling about this book so far? Do you think it’s important? Do you think you will read it? Do you think it might be too much for you? Let me know your thoughts in the comments!

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